Grieving | The Loss That Comes With Change

A Global Invitation to Expand Your Soul


Like many of you, I’ve been cautious about my global, national and local information consumption these days.  But I was introduced to an article from the Harvard Business Review (That Discomfort You’re Feeling Is Grief) that I found to be one of the most insightful pieces related to our current pandemic.  What a perfect word to describe the state of the world.

 

Grieving for those who have died, and anticipatory grief for more deaths to come.

 

Grieving for cancelled and postponed weddings, funerals, graduations, celebrations, traditions, holidays and gatherings.

 

Grieving when others don’t respond to the crisis in ways you think helpful or appropriate or safe.

 

Grieving that the “normal” way of life is gone.

 

Grieving that you have to be around family members you don’t like but also feeling guilty for feeling that way.

 

Grieving that all the control you thought you had is now gone.

 

Grieving the things you have to face now that most of your distractions are gone.

 

And the list could go on for a long time. 

 

I believe that all change involves grief:  whether it’s a shelter-in-place order or a new job or  the loss of something, there will always be a mourning of what used to be and an anticipation of what is to come.  And we as humans are so skilled at numbing ourselves to the pain of grief, because it’s awful and lonely at times and pretty miserable.

 

But, as one of my mentors will always say, grief also expands your soul.  Grief gives you a larger capacity to hold joy, empathy, compassion, hope, vision and grace, for yourself and others.

 

I encourage you to read the article mentioned above, and let me know if I can help in any way. 

 

With you and for you,

Alair

Photo by Markus Spiske on Unsplash

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Come in- how can I help?

Some different options about where we can start

Couple's Therapy

 

Understanding why we are disconnected and alone, and creating new ways of being with each other

Individual Therapy

 

Letting go of what needs to be released and discovering what needs to be found

Family Therapy

 

Learning new ways to care for family, and for kids and teens to share with their parents

 

Play Therapy

 

Helping kids explore and put words to their own world



sit and stay a while

Some thoughts I share on the "Rooted + Grounded" blog

 

 

Looking Back + Moving Forward

 

 

A helpful tool to reflect on 2020

and find hope for 2021


in the neighborhood

Some helpful resources in the nearby and virtual community

Taking Care of Yourself

National Child Traumatic Stress Network

 

 "This fact sheet offers caregivers a list of ideas for self-care strategies to use after a difficult event. This checklist outlines the three basics aspects of self-care including awareness, balance, and connection." 


 

Alair Olson, M.A.

 Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist

(LMFT#86504)

 

South Mission Valley | San Diego, CA  

858.634.0302 | therapy@alairolson.com